Election info / endorsements

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NEXT ELECTION: June 5, 2018

May 21, 2018: Last day to register to vote in this election
May 29, 2018: Last day to request a Vote by Mail ballot

Your polling place is open from 7 AM to 8 PM
General Information: https://votersedge.org

http://www.sos.ca.gov/elections/upcoming-elections/statewide-direct-primary-june-5-2018/

http://www.lavote.net/home/voting-elections/current-elections/find-my-election-information

 

ENDORSED BY PPDC


US Senate
NO CONSENSUS

​US Congress, 33rd District​
TED LIEU (incumbent)

Governor​
GAVIN NEWSOM

Lt. Governor
ED HERNANDEZ

Secretary of State
ALEX PADILLA (incumbent)

Attorney General
DAVE JONES

State Treasurer​
FIONA MA

State Controller
BETTY YEE (incumbent)

Insurance Commissioner
RICARDO LARA

​ Board of Equalization District 3 ​
CHERYL TURNER

​Superintendent of ​Public Instruction​
TONY THURMOND

State Senate, 26th District
BEN ALLEN (incumbent)

State Assembly, 50th District
RICHARD BLOOM (incumbent)

L.A. County Assessor
JEFFREY PRANG (incumbent)

L.A. County Supervisor,​ District 3
SHEILA KUEHL (incumbent)

​ Los Angeles County Sheriff
NO ENDORSEMENT

 

L.A. COUNTY, JUDGE OF SUPERIOR COURT
(L.A. County Dem Party recommendations)

Office No. 4 ………………………………. Veronica Sauceda
Office No. 16 ………………………………. Patricia (Patti) Hunter
Office No. 20 ………………………………. Wendy Segall
Office No. 60 ………………………………. Tony Cho
Office No. 63 ………………………………. no consensus
Office No. 67 ………………………………. Hon. Maria Lucy Armendariz
Office No. 71 ………………………………. no endorsement
Office No.113 ………………………………. Javier Perez
Office No.118 ………………………………. David D. Diamond
Office No.126 ………………………………. Rene Caldwell Gilbertson
Office No.146 ………………………………. Hon. Armando Duron


 

BALLOT MEASURES

68-69 endorsed

70 opposed

71-72 endorsed

 

YES on Proposition 68 — Bonds for Environment, Parks and Water
Authorizes $4 billion in general obligation bonds for: parks, natural resources protection, climate adaptation, water quality and supply, and flood protection. Fiscal Impact: increased state bond repayment costs averaging $200 million annually over 40 years. Local government savings for natural resources-related projects, likely averaging several tens of millions of dollars annually over the next few decades.

All Californians deserve access to clean drinking water and safe local parks. Prop 68 helps protect California’s air quality and places where families hike, camp, swim and play.

YES on Proposition 69 — Transportation Funding
Requires that certain revenues generated by a 2017 transportation funding law be used only for transportation purposes and generally prohibits Legislature from diverting funds to other purposes. Fiscal Impact: no direct effect on the amount of state and local revenues or costs but could affect how some monies are spent.

Prop 69 would make sure that money from gas and diesel taxes is only spent for transportation purposes like fixing roads and mass transit. This would help every community in the state and guarantee that taxes go to valuable transportation projects.

NO on Proposition 70 — Cap-and-Trade Amendment
Beginning in 2024, requires that cap-and-trade revenues accumulate in a reserve fund until the Legislature, by a two-thirds majority, authorizes use of the revenues. Fiscal Impact: beginning in 2024, potential temporary increase in state sales tax revenue, ranging from none to a few hundred million dollars annually, and possible changes in how revenue from sale of greenhouse gas emission permits is spent.

Requiring a two-thirds vote would make it far too difficult for lawmakers to reach an agreement and would adversely affect climate change policy.

YES on Proposition 71 — Ballot Measure Effective Date
Provides that ballot measures approved by a majority of voters shall take effect five days after the Secretary of State certifies the results of the election. Fiscal Impact: likely little or no effect on state and local finances.

Prop 71 is a simple, common sense update of our election laws. In a state where 53 percent of voters are registered to vote by mail, ballot measures should not go into effect until all votes have been counted.

YES on Proposition 72 — Taxes for Rainwater Capture Systems
Permits Legislature to allow construction of rain-capture systems, completed on or after January 1, 2019, without requiring property-tax reassessment. Fiscal Impact: probably minor reduction in annual property-tax revenues to local governments.

California has experienced periods of drought and will likely face more dry years in the future. Homeowners should not be penalized for installing rainwater capture systems that help our entire state.